Study in Portugal Network (SiPN) – Faculty Led Programs – January 2016

Study in Portugal Network – Faculty-led Programs – January 2016

In January 2016 the Study in Portugal Network received its first 3 short-term faculty-led programs.

We worked closely with faculty from Johns Hopkins University, the Rhode Island School of Design and the University of Rhode Island to design customized programs that met the curricular goals of each group.

8 graduate students from Hopkins engaged in consulting work with Portuguese start ups in the renewable energy sector and toured various cutting-edge Portuguese companies.

RISD brought 13 undergraduate architecture students and two accompanying faculty to engage in site visits all around the country, including studio tours with Pritzker-prize winning architects at the Univerity of Porto.

20 URI students and their accompanying faculty joined us for a far-reaching examination of Portuguese society, culture and business practices, including numerous guest lectures with recognized experts in their respective fields.

Watch the video:

Take a look at January term 2016 photos (links to SiPN Facebook page): here

More context about SiPN and it’s capacity to organize faculty-led customized programs?

The Study in Portugal Network (SiPN) is a project of the non-profit Luso-American Development Foundation (FLAD)  Our institutional contacts with the highest levels of the Portuguese government and US Embassy in Lisbon, not to mention business, research and civil society actors throughout the country, allow us to help you build customised faculty-led study tours with unparalleled access to key sectors of Portuguese society. Do you have an idea for a study tour that you’d like to explore with us? We can help you flesh out the who, where, what, how and at a price that is usually a fraction of what most program providers charge.

SiPN was designed by a US academic for fellow academics who wish to connect with Portugal but who may need assistance in building out their programs. Besides all the basic logistics like housing, insurance, domestic transport, etc., FLAD and its SIPN project can connect you with our network of top Portuguese universities, potential guest lecturers, key scientific researchers, policy and decision-makers, as well as the booming Portuguese startup scene. SiPN also possesses a large network of volunteer placements and over 150 credit-bearing internship opportunities for those looking to offer deeper ways for their students to connect with Portuguese society and culture.

FLAD’s scholarships and mobility program to the University of the Azores (build in link here to Crossing the Atlantic) can be synchronised with the SiPN faculty-led program, helping to keep costs extremely low for programs that have an Azorean component. For more information contact us directly at: [email protected] or [email protected]

www.studyinportugalnetwork.com
www.facebook.com/studyinportugalnetwork
www.twitter.com/SiPNetwork
www.youtube.com/channel/UCib_cUOpMC8YNhF­_GTU1dsQ\

“Leave a Mark in the City” – SiPN’s Spring 16 Collaborative Project

Arquivo 237 partnered with SiPN to support students in a creative project that was developed during their stay in Lisbon. We all wanted the students to leave a mark in the city and to interact with it by developing their critical artistic faculties. 

Lomography 4-shot cameras were the chosen devices since they encourage students to “experience the shot”, as they encourage action and provide an unusual view of the city. Also most of the students had never used an analogue camera before, so this was a new experience for them. We think both the process and results were positive!

Lomo 2

Lomo 3

Lomo1

What did the students do?

  • Students were divided into 4 groups.
  • March – Each group was given a lomography camera and were briefed on how to take photos of their favorite places/people/images of Lisbon. We suggested that the images should reflect their vision of Lisbon.
  • On April 2nd, Arquivo237 led a whole day illustration & collage workshop. Working in close collaboration with the graphic designer Margarida Rêgo, students illustrated the photos they took. Photos and final work were scanned and printed in poster format and were finally hung up in the street in different locations around the Bairro Alto neighborhood.
  • The entire process was filmed and a video will be presented on the 19th of May in Arquivo 237 when SiPN presents its Social Responsibility Program.

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Check Out the Final Results (Lomo Photos), Click HERE!

– About Arquivo 237

Arquivo 237

Arquivo237 is an independent cultural organisation based in Lisbon’s city centre. Its main mission is to be a platform to document, exhibit and implement creative projects and learning programmes, aiming to promote new learning possibilities.

Arquivo237 has a multidisciplinary team of creatives and art educators and an established network of national and international partner organisations.

It is our aim to promote research and sharing of knowledge and experience, as to collaborate regularly with high profile professionals working across different fields of the arts, targeting young people from diverse backgrounds.

Special thanks to our partners at Arquivo 237 , Joao Valente e Filipa Sousa, you guys were great and SiPN is looking forward to future collaborations.

Study in Portugal Network Featuring the Portuguese Kids!

The Portuguese Kids support the Study in Portugal Network!

When the Portuguese Kids were told about all the study abroad opportunities offered by the Study in Portugal Network (SiPN for short, which is managed by the Luso-American Development Foundation, also known as “FLAD”), they immediately demonstrated their support for the project. It aims to bring greater numbers of North American college students to Portugal.

The Kids rapidly understood the potential cultural, social and economic impact that could result from having Portuguese descendants and students from other nationalities choosing Portugal as a study abroad destination .

A big thank you to Derrick De Melo, Brian Martins, Alex Sardinha, and Jason Casimiro. These four Portuguese musketeers, who hail from southeastern Massachusetts, are taking the art of the ethnic comedy act to new heights. They’ve become a national sensation in recent years, and we are glad they support SiPN!

 

More about the Kids?

The story of The Portuguese Kids comedy troupe began in Fall River, MA when Derrick DeMelo, Jason Casimiro, Brian Martins and Al Sardinha, became friends as children, making each other laugh and putting on skits for their families. In college they produced “Ludicrous Speed,” a public access TV show and developed a love for making people laugh. After that, there were classes at Boston’s Improv Asylum. In fact, the founders of the school were so impressed by the comedy troupe’s innovation; they provided the start-up funds to bring The Portuguese Kids to a broader audience.

These days, their popular live shows and viral You Tube videos along with their own brand of humor, highlights the funny side of what it means to grow up Portuguese, The Portuguese Kidsproudly claim that being Portuguese is “unique, wonderful, and a lot of the time…funny!” Soon the Kids will be touring the Azores (June 26 to July 5th 2016).

Join them on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Vine andYouTube and follow them on their adventures!

 

SiPN Trip to the Azores – An homage to all Portuguese-Americans

 

As part of the SiPN experience, the program organizes field trips outside of Lisbon every semester for our students.
In Fall 2015, SiPN took its students to the island of Sao Miguel, in the Azores archipelago.

Monica Monteiro, featured in the video, is a Portuguese-American whose family came from the Azores to the US. She was a SiPN participant from Bentley University, Massachusetts, and an accounting major.

Although we welcome students from anywhere, this video pays homage to all Portuguese-Americans far from their ancestral roots.

Thanks to its large number of courses in English or Portuguese, SiPN provides an opportunity to reconnect with one’s heritage while making progress toward graduation.

A special thanks to our partners at SATA Air Azores who kindly donate free flights to selected SiPN participants.

Apply now: www.studyinportugalnetwork.com
More info? [email protected]

 

Why Lisbon Is One of the Coolest Cities in Europe?

This is the Portuguese capital’s moment — so what are you waiting for?

Underestimate Western Europe’s oldest capital at your peril. A port at the centre of what was once a vast and wealthy maritime empire will always be a cosmopolitan place to hang out. Lisbon does distinct districts beautifully, with the formality of the central Praça do Comércio (created after the earthquake of 1755) flanked by the winding lanes of the Alfama, the city’s centre under the Arabic occupation of Iberia, and the once-seedy and now achingly cool dockyard area of Cais do Sodré.
The city has rediscovered its mojo in a major way: where bacalao (salt cod) was once the culinary high (ie, not very high at all), young chefs are reimagining Portuguese petiscos (tapas); meanwhile, elegant town houses are being converted into chic hotels, and the nightlife is as good as any self-respecting seafront city should expect.

Tom Barber is a founder of originaltravel.co.uk

EATING & SLEEPING

Stay
While the Bairro Alto Hotel in the district of the same name remains a winner, we also love the new Hotel Valverde, located on the city’s most bling boulevard, and with rooms by the same designers as the Bairro Alto. After the inevitable big night out, retire to the Pateo garden, complete with pool, five o’clock tea and cocktail bar, or settle in for a movie in the small cinema. The restaurant serves a range of excellent modernPortuguese fare.

Stay While the Bairro Alto Hotel in the district of the same name remains a winner, we also love the new Hotel Valverde, located on the city's most bling boulevard, and with rooms by the same designers as the Bairro Alto. After the inevitable big night out, retire to the Pateo garden, complete with pool, five o'clock tea and cocktail bar, or settle in for a movie in the small cinema. The restaurant serves a range of excellent modern Portuguese fare. LunchExhibit A of the vision that is transforming the city's culinary fortunes, the 19th-century Mercado da Ribeira, which was getting a bit tired to say the least, has been completely overhauled (by Time Out, of all people). Half remains a traditional food market that's great for browsing, while the other half has been transformed into a food hall with outlets from some of Portugal's best chefs, including Alexandre Silva, previously of the excellent Bica
do Sapato restaurant. Sit at one of the long communal tables and try his black risotto with scallops and seaweed accompanied with a glass of Corrente white from the Alentejo wine region.DineLong Iberia's culinary poor relation, things are on a roll thanks largely to two chefs, Nuno Mendes (of Chiltern Firehouse fame) and
Jose Avillez (ex-El Bulli), who has opened five restaurants in the Cais do Sodré and Chiado districts. Avillez's Belcanto has just received a second Michelin star. Have the 360° Discoveries tasting menu, which shows how Portugal's former colonies have influenced the country's cuisine. belcanto.pt

Lunch
Exhibit A of the vision that is transforming the city’s culinary fortunes, the 19th-century Mercado da Ribeira, which was getting a bit tired to say the least, has been completely overhauled (by Time Out, of all people). Half remains a traditional food market that’s great for browsing, while the other half has been transformed into a food hall with outlets from some of Portugal’s best chefs, including Alexandre Silva, previously of the excellent Bica do Sapato restaurant. Sit at one of the long communal tables and try his black risotto with scallops and seaweed accompanied with a glass of Corrente white from the Alentejo wine region.

Dine
Long Iberia’s culinary poor relation, things are on a roll thanks largely to two chefs, Nuno Mendes (of Chiltern Firehouse fame) and

Jose Avillez (ex-El Bulli), who has opened five restaurants in the Cais do Sodré and Chiado districts. Avillez’s Belcanto has just received a second Michelin star. Have the 360° Discoveries tasting menu, which shows how Portugal’s former colonies have influenced the country’s cuisine. belcanto.pt

DO, DRINK & PARTY

SeeStreet art on an epic scale. The city may be on the up, but there were enough derelict buildings — and city-government visionaries — for artists such as local hero Vhils and Brazilian twins Os Gémeos to make some of the world's finest public art.DoUse the city as your base camp for everything from surfing in Cascais (half an hour to the west) to serious beach action in Comporta (an hour south), a supercool boho hangout where glamorous Lisbonites hire villas for the summer.ShopMore than a century on, the tiny shoe shop Sapataria do Carmo still stocks supremely dapper, handcrafted gents' footwear for about half the price you'd pay in London.Drink The nightlife action has moved along the Tagus river waterfront, from Doca de Alcantara in the shadow of the 25 de Abril Bridge to Cais do Sodré. A cracker is Pensão Amor, which was once a brothel frequented by sailors. It retains a bawdy bordello feel, with suitably X-rated artwork and objets de smut in the loos. And the cocktails are pretty decent. pensaoamor.ptPartyHead to hot bar and club A Bom, O Mau e O Vilão ("the good, the bad and the ugly"), which is very light on the latter, as Lisbon's abundant beautiful types congregate here. It's also a very convenient place to wander to and from Pensão Amor (see Drinks). It's just 30ft away and serves a wide range of craft gins and also hosts DJ-driven revelry until late at weekends.

See
Street art on an epic scale. The city may be on the up, but there were enough derelict buildings — and city-government visionaries — for artists such as local hero Vhils and Brazilian twins Os Gémeos to make some of the world’s finest public art.

Do
Use the city as your base camp for everything from surfing in Cascais (half an hour to the west) to serious beach action in Comporta (an hour south), a supercool boho hangout where glamorous Lisbonites hire villas for the summer.

Shop
More than a century on, the tiny shoe shop Sapataria do Carmo still stocks supremely dapper, handcrafted gents’ footwear for about half the price you’d pay in London.

Drink
The nightlife action has moved along the Tagus river waterfront, from Doca de Alcantara in the shadow of the 25 de Abril Bridge to Cais do Sodré. A cracker is Pensão Amor, which was once a brothel frequented by sailors. It retains a bawdy bordello feel, with suitably X-rated artwork and objets de smut in the loos. And the cocktails are pretty decent.pensaoamor.pt

Party
Head to hot bar and club A Bom, O Mau e O Vilão (“the good, the bad and the ugly”), which is very light on the latter, as Lisbon’s abundant beautiful types congregate here. It’s also a very convenient place to wander to and from Pensão Amor (see Drinks). It’s just 30ft away and serves a wide range of craft gins and also hosts DJ-driven revelry until late at weekends.

YES & NO

When in… Eat tinned fish. Head to the original Thirties Conserveira de Lisboa shop on Rua dos Bacalhoeiros or the outlet in the Mercado da Ribeira for delicious tinned anchovies, octopus and, best of all, sardines in lemon, packaged in beautiful vintage tins. Alternatively, the ring-pull cans make an ideal midnight refuel at Sol e Pesca, a fishing-tackle shop turned hip bar.AvoidFado, Portugal's inimitable and melancholic folk music. It has
its merits as a cultural phenomenon (so much so that it has just earned Unesco World Heritage status) and there are many wonderful practitioners of the art. But nothing will kill a night out's form quicker than being stuck in a restaurant listening to a fado singer in full remorse mode. Makes country music sound like euphoric trance.Why now?Because Lisbon is on. There might not be a cooler city in Europe at this precise moment, and these moments can be fleeting.This article was originally published in Esquire UK's November issue.

When in…
Eat tinned fish. Head to the original Thirties Conserveira de Lisboa shop on Rua dos Bacalhoeiros or the outlet in the Mercado da Ribeira for delicious tinned anchovies, octopus and, best of all, sardines in lemon, packaged in beautiful vintage tins. Alternatively, the ring-pull cans make an ideal midnight refuel at Sol e Pesca, a fishing-tackle shop turned hip bar.

Avoid
Fado, Portugal’s inimitable and melancholic folk music. It has its merits as a cultural phenomenon (so much so that it has just earned Unesco World Heritage status) and there are many wonderful practitioners of the art. But nothing will kill a night out’s form quicker than being stuck in a restaurant listening to a fado singer in full remorse mode. Makes country music sound like euphoric trance.

Why now?
Because Lisbon is on. There might not be a cooler city in Europe at this precise moment, and these moments can be fleeting.

This article was originally published in Esquire UK‘s November issue.

Underwater Systems and Technologies (LSTS, Univ. of Porto)

Institution: Underwater Systems and Technology Laboratory – LSTS (Faculty of Engineering – Porto University)
Language of the internship: English OR Portuguese
Type of internship: Full-Time opportunity
Session: June and July (session 1) OR July and August (session 2) Or June, July & August
Vacancies: 2
Location:  Porto
Areas of study: The LSTS is specialized in the design, construction, and operation of unmanned underwater, surface and air vehicles and on the development of tools and technologies for the deployment of networked vehicle systems.
Desired profile: Students should be enrolled in a Computer Science, Hardware/Software, Networking, Programming, Electrical Engineering, Marine Biology, Oceanography BS, MS or PHD program
Principal functions: Pursue a research project for 2 or 3 months.

FLAD promotes the Study in Portugal Network in the USA

(Article published in Portuguese newspaper – Jornal i, 07/17/2015)

According to the latest Institute for International Education (IIE) Open Doors Report, over 289,000 US students participate each year in short-term mobility programs overseas, or about 9% of the total US undergraduate population. While Europe remains the continent of choice for more than half of these students, with just three countries accounting for 32% of the worldwide total (the UK, Italy and Spain respectively in order of preference), Portugal sadly remains off the radar to most US students. For example, whereas almost 10,000 Erasmus mobility students chose Portugal last year, less than 200 Americans did the same.

The Luso-American Development Foundation (FLAD) has various projects aimed at changing this state of affairs, the most ambitious of which is the Study in Portugal Network (SiPN). SiPN was initiated in October 2014 as a 4-university consortium currently based in Lisbon. It includes ISCTE-IUL, a Universidade Católica Portuguesa em Lisboa, e as Universidades de Lisboa (UL) e Nova de Lisboa (UNL). Other partners include the Camara Municipal de Lisboa, a Commissão Fulbright, SATA, AICEP, a Embaixada Americana de Lisboa, e os Ministérios de Educação e Negocios Estrangeiros. Students typically come for a semester or less and are able to take a wide range of classes taught in English or Portuguese from any of the 4 schools. They may also choose to complete internships for academic credit during the summer. During Summer 2015, the program’s first, 23 students from the US and 1 from Scotland are attending the program.

As part of its marketing efforts to raise Portugal’s profile in North America, from May 24–29, FLAD participated in the biggest international education fair in North America, NAFSA – Association of International Educators. More than 11 thousand education-related professionals, an all-time record for this conference.

Study in Portugal Network - NAFSA

NAFSA 2015 (Boston, MA)

NAFSA was founded in 1948 as the National Association of Foreign Student Advisers to promote the professional development of U.S. college and university officials responsible for assisting and advising foreign students who had come to study in the United States after World War II. Since then, as awareness of the importance of international competence has grown, NAFSA’s name has changed to the Association of International Educators. Its 10,000 members from more than 3500 institutions in over 150 countries lead the way in building opportunities for Americans to study abroad, participate in scholarly exchange programs, and study foreign areas and languages.

 

Portugal was represented at NAFSA with two stands. The Study in Portugal pavilion was represented by 7 Portuguese institutions of higher education, as well as the municipal governments of Lisbon and Porto and the Portuguese Fulbright Commission. Their stand was primarily geared to promoting exchange agreements with US institutions and promoting Portugal as a destination for degree seekers.

 

FLAD, via its project SiPN, funded a stand next door aimed at promoting its study abroad program in Lisbon. The US Ambassador in Portugal, Robert Sherman, also participated in the expo, greeting guests in both booths and promoting Portugal as an ideal destination for American students. With FLAD’s financial support, the Ambassador and his wife Kim Sawyer offered a reception for SiPN at their home in Boston. This was attended by representatives from both booths as well as others invited by FLAD, including various US universities that have either already signed on as SiPN partners or those that may do so shortly. Together FLAD and all the other Portuguese participants in NAFSA were aligned with a similar goal: to drastically alter the number of US students choosing Portugal as their study abroad location.

 

Study in Portugal Network - NAFSA_Ambassador Sherman

US Ambassador to Portugal, Robert Sherman, at SiPN’s booth (NAFSA 2015)

 

Article in Portuguese (Jornal i)

Jornal i Study in oortugal Network 16_07_2015

 

 

 

Fulbright Grant exclusively for SiPN alumni

Fulbright-logo

Starting in 2016, SiPN alumni will enjoy priority access to a second Fulbright grant to Portugal, which will be funded entirely by the Luso-American Development Foundation (FLAD). FLAD presently co-funds one of the Fulbright – Luso-American Foundation Study/Research Grants to Portugal.

These 8-month student grants to Portugal are open to US citizens with at least a Bachelor’s degree and who are pursuing masters or PhD level research in any area. Applicants who are SiPN alumni and whose candidacy passes through the initial selection process conducted by the International Institute for Education will enjoy priority access to the pool for this second Fulbright, dramatically increasing your chances of being selected for a Fulbright. For more information on how to apply for a Fulbright and eligibility requirements, go here.

See here a message about SiPN’s partnership with Fulbright Portugal by the Commission’s Executive Director, Otília Reis.